Jones, Moore, Walton win 2017 Nell Ann Pickett Award

Congratulations to Natasha Jones, Kristin Moore, and Rebecca Walton, who were awarded the Nell Ann Pickett Award for their article, Disrupting the Past to Disrupt the Future: An Antenarrative of Technical Communication,” published in Volume 25.4, 2016. This award is given annually for the best article in ATTW’s journal, Technical Communication Quarterly, for the previous publication year. Judges for the award are previous award winners. It is named for a founding member of the association who initiated the award and originally funded it.

nellannpickettwinners
Rebecca Walton, Natasha Jones, and Kristin Moore, ATTW 2017 Awards Reception, Portland

Natasha Jones is an assistant professor at University of Central Florida. Kristin Moore is an assistant professor at Texas Tech University. Rebecca Walton is an assistant professor at Utah State University.

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Williams elevated to ATTW Fellow

Congratulations to Dr. Miriam Williams of Texas State University. Williams was elevated to ATTW Fellow at the 2017 conference in Portland, Oregon.

Read the citation read by Bill Hart-Davidson and written by Jerry Savage, with remarks from Natasha Jones, Michael Trice, and Emmelyn Wang.

ATTW 2017 participant information (updated)

ATTW 2017 is next this week! We wanted to round up all the information about conference events in one place before everyone starts traveling. Hopefully, this answers your last minute questions, but if not, please feel free to contact us at attworg@gmail.com.

All ATTW conference events are held at the Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Portland, 1000 NE Multnomah Street, Portland, Oregon 97232, +1-503-281-6111. It’s about a 15 minute walk from the Oregon Convention Center, near the Lloyd Center/NE 11th TriMet stop.

This post last updated Tuesday, March 14.

Weather-related cancellations

If you won’t be able to attend ATTW 2017 or the Women in TC luncheon because of travel problems related to Winter Storm Stella, we’re very sorry! Contact us at attworg@gmail.com and we’ll refund your registration fees. We’ll process the refunds after the conference.

Social media

Our social media ambassadors get started the week of the conference—more soon! Plan to tweet using the #attwcon hashtag. If you like, join our list of @ATTWorg tweeters.

Research Methods Workshops

Workshops will take place Tuesday, March 14 from 12:30-4:30p. Please arrive at least 15 minutes early to get checked in so that workshops can start on time.

We have Ross Island and Morrison rooms located on the first level from 12:30-4:30. Each room will have a projector and screen, but facilitators and participants should bring laptops.

The break will include regular and decaf coffee/tea, soft drinks, bottled water, and cookies.

Conference Check-in

The main room for ATTW on Wednesday will be Multnomah, which is on the first level of the  Doubletree. Check-in and registration will be available outside of this room beginning at 8:00 AM on Wednesday, March 15.

If you preregistered for the conference:

Look for someone with a cellphone or tablet to get you checked in quickly through Eventbrite. Pick up your nametag and program, and have a great conference!

If you registered, but need to pay onsite:

Look for Bradley Dilger or Stuart Blythe. They’ll help you finish your registration.

If you missed the online registration window:

Look for Bradley Dilger. He will be handling onsite registrations. Here are the costs for onsite registrations:

Full-time faculty or professionals $150.00
Contingent faculty $100.00
Students $75.00

Poster Presentation Information

Posters should be 30″ x 40″ or smaller to fit on the foam boards that will be provided.  We will provide foam boards, binder clips, and push pins to mount the posters.

Then the foam boards will be displayed on easels.

Presenter Information

Rooms will have a projector and Internet access. Presenters should bring laptops and connecting dongles for audio visual.

Each session is an hour and fifteen minutes. In general, with a panel of four, each presenter has fifteen minutes, leaving fifteen minutes for questions. The issue of when to take questions is up to the chair and the panel, but taking questions at the end, by which time everyone has had time to present, is a good idea.

We’ve updated (Sun Mar 12) the ATTW 2017 program preview which includes detailed session descriptions with a few late-breaking changes. Have a look — and plan your conference!

Women in TC Luncheon

The luncheon is scheduled for Multnomah on the first level of the Doubletree. Tickets to the luncheon are sold out. Organizers will check people in at the door using the Eventbrite registration information.

Accessibility

Please refer to the CCCC accessibility guide (link is PDF).

If you have have accessibility concerns for which you need assistance, please contact Michelle Eble at EBLEM@ecu.edu.

Portland Information

The local arrangements committee for CCCC has created a Portland 2017 web site with information about restaurants, ground transportation, and more.

From Our Conference Co-Chairs

We look forward to welcoming your to the 20th Annual Conference of the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW), where we will be celebrating the 20th anniversary of the conference itself.

The city of Portland and the anniversary suggests a Kairotic moment to gauge our field’s depths and currents, forge new tributaries, and steward a sustainable future. This is where the theme of this year’s conference came from. “Celebrating 20—Retrospection and New Directions in Technical Communication,” acts as a call for collective disciplinary reflections and envisions, to relay the legacy of ambition, retrospection, and innovation, established from the founders of our field.

Thanks to your great submissions, we have thus compiled a conference program that includes 29 concurrent sessions, 2 workshops, and 20 posters. These presentations represent a wide variety of topics on technical communication research, pedagogy, and practice. We hope you will find this conference both inviting and invigorating.  

ATTW 2017 Program (PDF)

As the largest city, Bridgetown and seaport in Oregon, Portland provides the perfect platform for ATTW’s 20th anniversary conference by reminding us of the importance of connections across disciplines, campuses, research interests, and industries. While you create professional connections at the conference, we hope you can also take time to enjoy the many cultural and historical sites as well as wonderful cuisine and breweries offered by Portland.

Please register for the conference by Friday March 3, 2016. Onsite registration will be available, but will include a $25 onsite surcharge registration fee. Attendees may register online and pay at the door if necessary.

We look forward to seeing you in person and watching the new connections forged in Portland!

Huiling Ding and Huatong Sun
ATTW Conference Co-chairs

CPTSC 2017 Call For Proposals

Conference Theme: User-centered program design

When we think of programmatic issues, we often think about our program’s identity from an administrative perspective and focus on how institutional, governmental, social, economic, and situational forces influence and shape our programs. But as programs in technical, professional, and scientific communication, where we place a high value on user-centered design and user advocacy, we should also be thinking about our users. The primary users for our programs are, of course, students. For this year’s conference, we focus on how responding to student needs shapes our programs, according to three main areas: recruitment, retention & engagement, and graduation (career advancement).

Recruitment

Student recruitment is critical to the sustainability and life of any program. In examining recruitment, we seek to raise and answer questions about what factors contribute to students choosing technical and professional communication programs.

  • What are the demographics and characteristics of students who select our programs, and how do we address this target audience when we recruit?
  • How can we market our programs, both on our campus and in our communities, to attract a diverse range of students?
  • How can we use the service course to recruit students?
  • What are the needs of students from diverse populations, and how can we address these

    needs?

  • What stakeholders, venues, and locations can we reach out to in order to recruit students?
  • In what ways can we develop our faculty, curriculum, and infrastructure to attract students?
  • What are other effective strategies for recruiting students to our programs?
  • What are other effective strategies for building program identity and marketing programs to

    students?

Retention and Engagement

Engaging and retaining students is critical to program sustainability. In examining retention and engagement, we will explore both pedagogical and administrative practices.

  • What pedagogical practices contribute to retention and meeting student needs and how effective are these practices?
  • How does service learning, community engagement, and other experiential practices contribute to retention and engagement?
  • How do internships and other practices that prepare students to be successful in the job market or in their careers contribute to retention and engagement?
  • How can we use other practices such as advising, mentoring, extracurricular and sponsored activities to improve retention and engagement? What do these practices look like?
  • How does the use of technology serve students’ needs and contribute to retention? For example, do millennials use and learn technologies differently and what does this mean for our programs in terms of resource investment and curriculum? How do programs balance student needs and technology cost?
  • How do specific delivery modes (online, hybrid, and f2f) serve students’ needs and contribute to retention and engagement?
  • What can we learn from our students while they are still in our programs to help us better retain future students and meet their needs? What types of data from current students can help us both recruit students and prepare them for their future careers?

Continue reading “CPTSC 2017 Call For Proposals”

Sponsorship at ATTW 2017

ATTW announces new sponsorship opportunities that offer publishers, universities, and other sponsors greater visibility throughout the 2017 annual conference.

Meet the People who Shape the Field of Technical Writing:

  • Share your catalog with program coordinators and instructors
  • Meet graduate students who will lead tomorrow’s classrooms
  • Have your publications seen by faculty and students from universities across the country.

Sponsorship benefits include:

  • Visibility in the program
  • Recognition at conference events
  • Program advertisements
  • Exhibition tables at the publishers’ event
  • Other opportunities to make your branding visible to all conference attendees

To choose your level of support, visit our sponsorship opportunities page. The deadline is February 14, 2017.

You can email any questions to sponsorship@attw.org

 

2017 ATTW Career Workshop

Since 2009, under the leadership of Richard Johnson-Sheehan and Lisa Meloncon, the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW) has offered a successful Career Workshop at the annual conference. Each year, about 25 faculty members and 30 graduate students participate.

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ATTW 2016 career workshop in Houston, Texas

The workshop gives graduate students in Technical Communication, Professional Writing, Rhetoric, and Composition opportunities to meet with faculty from a variety of universities.

The workshop will be held at the ATTW Conference in Portland, OR on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 from 4:00 to 5:15 pm. (Rooms TBD.) The ATTW Conference meets at the DoubleTree by the Hilton Portland, 1000 NE Multnomah St.. (You can learn more about ATTW and the ATTW Conference at http://www.attw.org/conference).

The workshop format is “speed dating.” Graduate students and faculty members meet one-to-one in five minute segments, so they can share ideas, talk about the job market, and discuss preparing for the job search.

Graduate students:

The format gives you an opportunity to meet professors from other universities, discuss your career goals and learn more about their programs. You will also receive a helpful 20-page guide that will help you navigate the job search process from beginning to end.
Please RSVP to Lora Arduser by February 24. Then, bring a one-page CV and business cards that you can leave with people in the workshop and at the conference. You do not need to be registered for the conference to participate in the workshop, but we encourage you to join us for the day.
If you have questions, email Lora Arduser (lora.arduser@uc.edu) or Lisa Meloncon (lisa.meloncon@uc.edu).

Faculty:

This workshop is always fun, and it’s a good way to meet up-and-coming members of our field and potential members of the ATTW. Even if your program isn’t hiring next year, we could use your expertise and wisdom. There is no preparation. If you might be hiring, though, this workshop is a great way to meet the people who you might want to interview next year.
To volunteer, email Lora Arduser (lora.arduser@uc.edu) with your name and affiliation by February 24, 2017.
If you are unable to attend, please share this post with your graduate students who might be interested.

ATTW 2017 Sponsorship and Advertising Opportunities

ATTW is pleased to offer these great opportunities for advertising your technical and professional writing program, or for gaining visibility at the conference through sponsorship.

Advertising

Advertising at the conference allows you to highlight programs, share accomplishments, or promote textbooks designed by  your program.

Full page advertisements are $100. You can secure your place in the program by purchasing an ad on our sponsorship opportunities page. The deadline for purchasing advertising is February 14, 2017.

Sponsorship

Another way to increase your visibility at the conference is to become a conference sponsor. There are levels of sponsorship to fit every department, organization, and publisher budget.

Sponsorship benefits include:

  • Visibility in the program
  • Recognition at conference events
  • Program advertisements
  • Exhibition tables at the publishers’ event
  • Other opportunities to make your branding visible to all conference attendees

To choose your level of support, visit our sponsorship opportunities page. The deadline is February 14, 2017.

You can email any questions to sponsorship@attw.org

 

ATTW Announces 2017 Graduate Research Award Winners

ATTW is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017 ATTW Graduate Research Awards. In our commitment to advancing graduate students in the field, the award’s purpose is to support and advance the research of graduate students in the latter stages of their PhD programs.

Congratulations to the following recipients for their contributions to research in technical and professional communication:

  • Jeffrey Gerding, Purdue University, “Advocating for Users, Engaging Citizens: Analyzing User Experience Research and the Rhetoric of Civic Engagement in Public Sector Digital Service Design”
  • Eric Stephens,  Clemson University, “Correctional Inclinations: Using Big Data to Trace Correctional Officer Handbooks”
  • Rachel Tofteland-Trampe, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, “Developing Digital Literacies: Engaging Technical Communication at an Urban Community Technology Center”

The award selection committee was really impressed with the quality and potential contributions of these research projects. Award recipients will be featured and present their research in a panel at the annual ATTW conference, which will be held on March 15, 2017, in Portland, OR.

The Association of Teachers of Technical Writing (ATTW) is an active professional organization of about 500 teachers, researchers, and practitioners of technical communication. Formed in 1973 to encourage dialogue among teachers of technical communication and to develop technical communication as an academic discipline, the organization boasts an international and interdisciplinary membership. ATTW produces Technical Communication Quarterly, a leading academic journal, and it collaborates with Taylor & Francis/Routledge to publish the ATTW Book Series in Technical and Professional Communication.

CFP: TCQ special issue

CFP: Special Issue on Medical Humanities and/or the Rhetoric of Health and Medicine

liz-angeliNearly twenty years ago, the landmark special issue on “Medical Rhetoric” was published in Technical Communication Quarterly. Since then, research in this area has flourished, with scholars publishing numerous books, articles, and special issues on the topic. The editors of that special issue, Barbara Heifferon and Stuart Brown, noted how the humanities—specifically rhetoric and technical communication—could “suggest alternative discursive practices” in healthcare workplaces (p. 247). Their goal rick-johnson-sheehanwas to reunite the disciplines of rhetoric and medicine, a split that can be dated back to Platonic times (Bell et al., 2000).

Following the lead of that TCQ special issue, editors of special issues in other journals have worked to position medical rhetoric within the broader field of the medical humanities and in relation to other healthcare fields. In 2005, the Journal of Business and Technical Communication published a special issue on “The Discourses of Medicine.” In the editor’s introduction, Ellen Barton noted the interdisciplinary breadth of the field. The discourses of medicine, she pointed out, had become a space where the humanities, the social sciences, and medicine merged. Other special issues narrowed the scope of the field by focusing on topics such as online health communication (Koerber & Stills, 2008), the relationship between writing and medicine (Haas, 2009), the importance of publics in healthcare issues (Keränen, 2014), and the centrality of communication design to health-related fields (Meloncon & Frost, 2015). These collections further refined and clarified the research scope of the field.

Recently, though, some researchers in this field have been leaving behind the title of “medical rhetoric” in order to draw a distinction between themselves and the medical humanities. They have adopted the title “Rhetoric of Health and Medicine (RHM),” which is simultaneously more specific and more expansive than medical rhetoric. In advocating for the term “RHM,” Blake, Segal, and Keränan ask scholars to engage “in programs of research that complement, but are different from, programs of research in bioethics, medical humanities, health communication, or the allied health professions” (2013, p. 2). The medical humanities, as Keränan argues, are concerned with “humane—and distinctly human—dimensions of health and medicine” (2014). To query these dimensions, medical humanities scholars traditionally use theoretical frameworks and methods from the humanities, social sciences, and the arts. Alternatively, as Blake, Segal, and Keränan argue, RHM scholars should “query medicine’s epistemology, culture, principles, practices, and discourses” with the goal of improving areas of medical practice (2013, p. 2).

In this special issue, we are looking for articles that explore the intersections and tensions between RHM and the medical humanities. At this nascent stage in the field’s development, we wonder whether separating RHM from the medical humanities might curtail opportunities for research, curriculum development, and engagement. Separating too early could have unintended ideological and practical repercussions; it could restrict research funding opportunities, and it might limit our access to political capital. Ideologically, this split risks reinforcing an outmoded but still existent two-culture division between STEM and the liberal arts, undermining the re-unification of medicine and rhetoric that Heifferon and Brown (2000) thought medical rhetoric could achieve. For practical reasons, we are concerned that such a split could also potentially cut RHM researchers off from the financial and political resources that are currently flowing into the medical humanities, which is one of the fastest growing areas in academia today, with universities like Yale, Ohio State, and Baylor adding medical humanities programs to their curriculums.

As we approach the 20-year mark from that original special issue in TCQ, we would like to turn our attention back to defining the fields of medical rhetoric, RHM, and the medical humanities. Similar to Heifferon and Brown’s (2000) goal to restore the natural connections between rhetoric and medicine, we aim to learn how two related areas—RHM and the medical humanities—can mutually inform each other. This CFP invites submissions that put these areas into conversation and engage questions like the following:

  • Building on Blake, Segal, and Keränan’s (2013) observation that RHM complements but is different from the medical humanities, how can RHM complement the medical humanities? How can the medical humanities complement RHM?
  • How can theoretical frameworks and methods used in RHM and the medical humanities intersect in ways that allow the fields to work together?
  • How can RHM scholars participate in and contribute to the medical humanities? Likewise, how can scholars in the medical humanities participate in RHM?
  • In what ways can research in the medical humanities be applied to healthcare workplaces, similar to RHM?
  • In what ways can RHM and medical humanities scholars make a meaningful impact on the medical field, broadly defined?
  • With the advent of telemedicine, the medical workplace has become distributed across time and location. How has this shift impacted RHM and the medical humanities? How can these areas contribute to understanding telemedicine?
  • How has RHM scholarship impacted technical communication? In what ways can the medical humanities impact technical communication? What RHM and medical humanities theoretical frameworks, methods, or findings can be imported into technical communication?

This issue is scheduled for January 2018. Please email 500-word proposals to Elizabeth Angeli (elizabeth.angeli@marquette.edu) and Richard Johnson-Sheehan (rjohnso@purdue.edu) by the deadline of January 17, 2017.  For accepted proposals, complete manuscripts will be due by July 17, 2017. In the meantime, we welcome questions via email from potential contributors.

PDF Medical Humanities/Rhetoric of Health and Medicine CFP